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Ep. 141: Lash Anarchist Own Who You Are And Get What You Want In The Beauty Industry

  

You have to stop second guessing yourself - show up exactly as you are.

    

You guys, for this episode, I'm bringing on someone who I think is totally going to change your life. She is such a motivator. You know how one of my goals for this year is to lean into my truth more? Well, this girl is like...it's her whole brand.

Okay, okay I'm talking about Ali Lilly AKA Lash Anarchist. Come on with that name! Not only is Ali just a revolutionary in the lash world but she's also a coaching client of mine! Yeah, Ali's one of my students. And she's also a good friend. And in this episode, she has some gifts for you. I know that a lot of people struggle being authentic online. A lot of people struggle with finding their own unique brand that will help them stand out. Why? Because that means being yourself. And that is SCARY. Because people on the internet can be really mean. It's a vulnerable position, I know.

But Ali has built this entire brand, Lash Anarchist, from something that is SO truly deeply her and she is totally unapologetic about it! She's incredible and I know that this episode is going to be extremely helpful for those of you who are struggling. Let's get into it!

 

 

Here are the episode highlights:

‣‣  [13:33]  Ali gives us a little background into who she is and how she got into the lash industry 9 years ago.

‣‣  [16:50]  One of the things I love most about Ali is how honest she is. She knows who she is and she's not afraid to be upfront and center about it. So I want to talk about how she got to this point in developing her own personal brand.

‣‣  [26:20]  Our best advice for those of you afraid to be more "you" on social media/in your business? Develop an authentic alter ego.

‣‣  [32:35]  This episode is all about how important the ability to communicate is for leaders. So here I ask Ali to share one of the most difficult conversations she ever had that makes her proud of herself.

‣‣  [35:16]  Why is communication so important? And why is the WAY that we communicate essential? What about all of that makes us good leaders?

‣‣  [47:26]  Do you agree with this statement: the universe rewards risk?

‣‣  [56:45]  A lot of people are afraid of failure - but failure often teaches us some of the greatest lessons. So I ask Ali for her favorite failure.

‣‣  [01:07:18]  For those just starting out who are like "how do I stand out in this industry that is just so saturated?" this is our advice to you.

 

 

I'M READY TO BE ME! (Listen Here) 

  

Ali is INCREDIBLE and I know you all need more of her in your life so follow her on Instagram, here!

 

You can follow me, Sheila Bella, on Instagram @realsheilabella!

  

Here are the links that were mentioned in the podcast! 

Pretty Rich Bosses

New Clients Consistently

Text me! (310) 388-4588

 


 

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You can enjoy a transcript of the podcast here.

Sheila Bella:

She's the Lash Anarchist, she's Ali Lilly, and she doesn't like rules. Today, we're going to show you how to be yourself, own who you are and get what you want on today's episode of Pretty Rich Podcast. Here we go.

 

Welcome to Pretty Rich Podcast where you're totally the heroine of your own story. I'm your host, Sheila Bella, and I've built a seven figure PMU beauty biz and a seven figure online biz without a degree, without a fancy website or a sugar daddy. And if you and I hang out on here long enough, you're going to start to believe that you can do it too. How about that for a side effect of listening to this podcast? Because you really can. I know you think I don't know you, I have no idea who you are, but I do. I really, really do because I am you. I was you.

 

And I believe we are all on the same journey together. My perfect job didn't exist, so I created it. The job I wanted wasn't hiring me, wanted nothing to do with me. So, I skipped the line and hired myself as CEO just like you can. So, consider me your secret beauty biz BFF. In case you need to be reminded on a weekly basis, that power is never just handed to you, you have to take it. Are you ready beauty boss? Let's jump in.

 

What's up, you guys. Welcome to another amazing episode of Pretty Rich Podcast. Guys, my six year old just came here and was just like, "Oh, man." He seemed like he had the biggest problem ever. And then he was like, "You know, I got to talk to dada because Grey's copying me." Grey is his little brother. He's three. I'm like, "Okay."

 

I was like, "Beau, I just paid pretty much half my money in taxes right now. I just got an unexpected, nasty email from a stranger right now calling me the R word and a bunch of really mean things like. And your biggest problem right now is that your little brother is mimicking what you're doing?" Anyway.

 

I didn't say that to him. Obvi. I hope that's obvious. I didn't say that to him, but I just think it's really cute. I think it's really cute that like, and I couldn't help it. I smiled. I didn't want to laugh like right in his face, but I'm like, "Oh my God, they're so innocent. They're so innocent." Oh, to be young again. Okay. I digress. Guys, I have a really amazing guest for you guys today. She is the Lash Anarchist. She's Ali Lilly. She's actually my coaching client. And she's one of the leaders in the lash industry.

 

She has been pushing limits for as long as I've met her. So yeah, and her lashing, she has a very unique brand. And guys, when you hear the story of how her brand was born, I want you to really pay attention because it's going to teach you how to be fearless. And as a matter of fact, I've known her for a while and I never heard this story and it's, oh my gosh, it was so cool how she came up with the branding for this. Because she first did it anonymously. She did it anonymously. She wanted to be like Serena in Gossip Girl. She was like XOXO Gossip Girl. And it was anonymous. And so, it gave her the freedom to totally be herself and just say whatever was on her mind and do whatever the F she wanted.

 

And she would curse left and right and people loved it. And I was like, "Oh my gosh, that's what we're all missing." What would you do if there were no consequences? And we also talked about communication because she's such a master communicator. And her and I both agree that people who can't communicate think everything is an argument, but communication is important. As a leader, if you're going to be any type of leader, a leader to your family, a leader to your team, a leader in the industry.

 

So, when you're faced with harsh criticism, you got to ask yourself first, is it truly harsh or is it constructive if I take the emotion out of it? Do you guys struggle with this, with communication and having difficult conversations with people? So, step one is controlling your ego, right? Being able to hear feedback objectively is the only way to maintain integrity with yourself and also as a leader.

 

You can't lose it. If you lose it, you're losing. So, up and down, all around, being a better communicator is key. And getting good at sharing information, teaching information is so important. So, I think communication is probably the most critical skill that a leader should have. Right? You should be able to get your point across freely. Like really what's on your mind freely if you're going to be a leader. And in a way that, yeah, people are going to understand as much as possible, right?

 

So, I think that the universe rewards risk. I say that all the time, people who don't shy away from difficult conversations have a leg up in life. I think of all of the successful people I know and they risk. They're not afraid to say it, to do the hard things and to say the challenging things. Right? And they're open to feedback because being "owned", like ooh, I got owned, right?

 

It's not being owned. It's a discussion. Why would you not be okay with exchanging bad ideas for better ideas? It's just a discussion. It doesn't always have to be an argument. And I feel like people who can't communicate think that everything is an argument, right? Or they see Lash Anarchist, Ali Lilly's Instagram page and there's F-bombs and middle fingers. And I don't know. Why not be curious and find out what's going on over here, what's going on? What are you trying? You know what I mean?

 

It's not always an argument. It doesn't have to be controversial. And honestly, speaking of controversial, there are a lot of controversial topics that surround our society that we shy away from for fear of being misunderstood or fear of offending others. And it's understandable. Right? But I just think nowadays that the worst thing we can do is to stop communicating altogether. That's the worst thing we can do. Oxygen is literally what relationships are built on.

 

So, instead of... My computer. I'm sorry about that, you guys. Instead of focusing on the negatives and the discomfort of it all, I think we should focus our efforts on becoming better listeners and communicators. And Ali is such an amazing example of that, right? I'm really excited to share her with you guys. We did an Instagram Live and this is the audio version of it. So, if you're like, "Wait, what are they referring to?" It's because we were on IG Live. It's pretty awesome.

 

And by the way, you guys, if this podcast helps you out in any way at all, if it blesses you, if I've graced your morning, afternoon, or evening, and you're like, "Well, that made me feel really good. I feel really connected to myself and the universe and my friends and my family because of this podcast." Okay? If you like this at all, I would highly, highly encourage you to please leave a five-star review on iTunes. At the end of every month, I choose one lucky winner to win one of our courses in Pretty Rich Bosses, any one of our beauty business online marketing courses. And especially if you leave your IG handle in the review itself, I know where to find you. And I'm going to be giving you a shout out. Guys, welcome Ali Lilly at Lash Anarchist.

 

Hi, everyone. What's going on? Today, today. I feel like I always say I have a very special guest. No, really though. I have a really awesome chick to introduce to you guys. She's going to teach you guys how to get what you want through being yourself, being yourself. Own who you are, get what you want. Who wants to own who they are and get what they want? Who wants to stop pretending to be somebody else? Like, oh my gosh, you go on Instagram and then you're like, "Oh my gosh, all these people in my industry have this energy that I just don't freaking have." Do you guys feel that way when you're scrolling? You're like, "Ugh." You're not even posting anymore because you just feel so much pressure to be just like everyone else.

 

I get it. I get it. Believe it or not. You don't believe me, whatever. I'm going to tell you because it's my truth. I feel that way. I feel that way sometimes. Especially when I haven't been on here in a minute, when I haven't been on here in a minute, I'm scrolling and I'm just like, "I just can't match their energy." And you guys probably think I'm lying because you think I'm the energy monster. And then I just realized like, "Oh wait, I do have high energy." Once I start doing it…

 

Anyway, one of my new year's resolutions is to lean in more to my truth, to be even more authentic. If it's not feeling real to me right now. I'm not going to say it. If it's not my real life, I'm not going to post it. Right? I don't want to post anything that doesn't feel and that I'm not truly feeling on the inside. If I'm hella tired right now, I'm going to tell you. If I'm annoyed right now, I'm going to tell you. If my kids are making me irritable right now, I'm going to tell you.

 

So, one of my things is just to lean into truth. And I find that if I just really remember that, honestly, that's what matters and that's the kind of content people want to see, I'll probably be more consistent in producing content. And my guest today, my friend, my client, my student in Pretty Rich Bosses, Ali Lilly, the Lash Anarchist. You guys, first of all, I mean, Lash Anarchist, she is so real. So, so real and I just love her. I know you guys are going to love her too. And she's going to talk to you guys all about how to own who you are and get what you want. And I have some questions for her about how she does it because she does such an amazing job at it. Go creep on her, Live is on, because you're going to see what I'm talking about. That's what I'm talking about. That's what I'm talking about. Ali.

Ali Lilly:

Hello. How are you?

Sheila Bella:

I'm good. Okay.

Ali Lilly:

Oh, I'm playing with filters.

Sheila Bella:

Go for it, girl. Instagram is doing that thing. So, there's a bug on Instagram right now where you think that you're perfectly framed, but then the rest of us see you like this. So there's a bug. So, stand a little bit further back. Yeah, that's good.

Ali Lilly:

Right there?

Sheila Bella:

No, not there. A little further. You'll see. Yeah, that's perfect. Yeah, Instagram's doing the thing. I look at other people's lives and every time I get on the Live, I have to stand back.

Ali Lilly:

Okay.

Sheila Bella:

I tried to Google this bug this morning and I don't freaking know. I don't freaking know.

Ali Lilly:

That's interesting.

Sheila Bella:

[inaudible 00:12:18]. Oh my gosh. Ali, I'm excited to chat with you today. What are you drinking? I'm drinking kombucha. Are you drinking [crosstalk 00:12:26]?

Ali Lilly:

Water. Just water.

Sheila Bella:

I have that too. I feel like I have three beverages with me all the time. I have this one. I have a sparkling water. I always have to drink kombucha.

Ali Lilly:

I know. I usually have a coffee, and a green juice, and a water, but today it's just water. I was not prepared.

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. Earlier. Oh yeah, I do have a coffee outside. I do have a coffee outside. It's just sitting there waiting for me. Wow, you guys are so sweet. Okay. So, I love that you're in the lash world and I'm in the PMU world, and I feel like our worlds are like sister worlds.

Ali Lilly:

Exactly.

Sheila Bella:

Right? A lot of lash artists do PMU, a lot of PMU artists do lashes and vice versa. Or if not, there are so many parallels between our industries. So, for those people who are just finding about you for the very first time, hello, you're welcome everyone. Thank you. So, tell us about yourself and don't be shy. And I know you won't be.

Ali Lilly:

I know. Yeah. I'm not usually a shy person. So, I started off in the lash industry about nine years ago. It's like between eight and nine years ago. And I started off as a lash artist because my mom is a lash artist and she started a lash line. And I just noticed, I mean, I was a cocktail server at the time. I worked at a bar. I was having a fun little party girl life.

Sheila Bella:

That was 10 years ago, 9 years ago?

Ali Lilly:

It was nine years ago. Yep. That's so weird to say. Yeah. And I just noticed that my mom was making more money than me and was doing less work and was getting better sleep. And her job was fun. So, I was like, "You know what, I'm going to go to school and see if I can also do this job." It just looks better. Plus I just wanted to make more money and I'm not the best server. Actually, I'm a really terrible server. So, I was really looking forward to finding a way out of that.

 

Yeah. So, I ended up enrolling in a class. I decided one day and I enrolled in a class the next day and just went to school, and I don't know, that's how I make my decisions. Just very spur of the moment. But anyway, yeah. So, I started doing lashes. I worked with her for a while then for myself, and then we started a salon together and then I started my own salon. And I went into teaching and then I started my own mega volume line, which was just something that was lacking in the industry at the time.

 

So, I got into that not thinking it would be anything very big, but that's when I started Lash Anarchist. And so, I have my product line and I have my trainings and that's where we're at right now. So, it's been a wild ride.

Sheila Bella:

Okay. So, you have your product line and you have your trainings, and you're one of the leaders in your industry. So I'm just-

Ali Lilly:

Thank you.

Sheila Bella:

... so excited to work with you. I think if anybody creeps on your page for the first time, they might have a reaction one way or another, like, "Oh my God, I love this girl." Or like, "Oh my God, who is she? What's going on?" One of your webinar last month was called raise your damn prices.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah. Yes.

Sheila Bella:

A title I love and I approved. That's great, but it's so to the point. And I think a lot of your content and just a lot of your personality is very to the point and for lack of a better term, you bring a lot of, I guess, masculine energy. I think but what's made you successful in business is a combination of those two energies. You have so much feminine, nurturing energy. You're okay with feeling your feelings.

 

So, I love that about you. So, tell us about your brand, what the impression people get when they first see your brand and how you came about just owning who you are and just being your damn self, raising your damn prices?

Ali Lilly:

So, let me tell you, it was not the easiest thing for me and it wasn't a quick process. People are always like, how do I find my voice? How was your branding so authentic to you? And I'm like, "It's not something that I didn't have to work on, honestly." So, for a long time, I didn't really work on branding myself at all or my businesses, or having my own personal voice in my businesses, I guess.

 

So, what I would do is I would look at the industry and see what other people were doing and then I would copy it. And I'd be like, "Oh, well, this is what people want me to do." They want soft colors and they want me to act professionally and dress up for work and not say swear words on social media.

Sheila Bella:

I know.

Ali Lilly:

And that's what I did for a really long time. And my last name is Lilly. And so, when I finally decided to get social media, which was like four and a half years ago, which is insane to me, I named myself Lash Lilly. And I was like, "Oh, that's cute and it makes sense. It's my last name," whatever. But I found myself trying to post things that fit into that idea of lilies and flowers and stars.

 

Yeah. And if we're going to be honest, I'm not really that type of girl. I've never been very girly girl. I've always been a very blunt person, blunt speaker. It's something that my dad actually has told me my whole life is my blessing and my curse. But he's like, "You're always just to the point. You don't mince words." I'm like, "Yeah, I don't."

Sheila Bella:

When I talk to you though, you are direct, but you're kind.

Ali Lilly:

I mean, I definitely try to be. I feel like I used to be a little bit more direct and less kind in business. Because I thought I had to be that too. It's really weird. You have this idea of what you have to be to be a business owner. And then I think you go through it and you learn things over the years, you know?

Sheila Bella:

Yeah.

Ali Lilly:

So now I'm a lot more compassionate. And I try to let people have their emotions or whatever when actually that used to bother me. I think I'm probably [crosstalk 00:19:40]. I hated being a salon owner because I couldn't handle the emotions of my employees. I was like, "Bro, no. No." So now it's a little bit different. But yeah, when I started my product line... Actually, do you mind if I turn off the air in here really quick?

Sheila Bella:

No, not at all.

Ali Lilly:

Okay.

Sheila Bella:

Go for it.

Ali Lilly:

It feels loud and it's bugging me.

Sheila Bella:

Okay. So, I'm going to elaborate on that. So, when you are first making your way your first, like 100K, I feel like we all think we need to be in hustle mode and we all need to be hard, hard, hard, hard, hard, hard, right? Like, don't feel your feelings, don't feel your feelings, don't feel your feelings.

 

And then I think the more successful you get, it's you have to be gracious with yourself or else you're not going to be successful. Like you learn like, "Oh, okay. All right. I have to take time for me." And like, "Oh, okay. I have to allow myself to feel those things." But I think to your first 100K, that's the mode that I was in. That's the mode you got to be in because you're a nobody right now. Okay. So, how did you transition from Lash Lilly, first of all. What the-

Ali Lilly:

[crosstalk 00:21:13]. I was like, "Oh, it's my last name. It's cute. People will remember it. I don't know. But also I was new to Instagram and social media. I had never branded a business online. So, I just didn't even know what the fuck to do. So, yeah. So, what I ended up doing was I started an Instagram called Lash Anarchist and what I wanted to do was do something kind of like a Gossip Girl situation where nobody knew who I was.

Sheila Bella:

How cute.

Ali Lilly:

I wanted to review other company's products and their trainings but anonymously so nobody knew who it was.

Sheila Bella:

Lash industry people are so creative. You have the cutest, I don't know. PMU artists, you guys step it up because lash industry ideas, that is so cute. And did you do that? Did you review people's?

Ali Lilly:

So, I did it for a few months and I ended up liking it so much more because I did all of the branding, like all the colors. I have a little blog and everything, so everything that I did for it, it was all dark and neon. And like I don't know.

Sheila Bella:

Did you have an alias name? Your lash?

Ali Lilly:

Well, it was Lash Anarchist.

Sheila Bella:

So, did you sign it, love Serena?

Ali Lilly:

Oh, no.

Sheila Bella:

Or like XOXO Blair?

Ali Lilly:

The Lash Anarchist. But what I ended up doing is just loving it so much. And I spent all of my time writing on this blog literally for nobody to see. Like this blog went absolutely nowhere. And I got to the point where I wanted to start my own line. Because I had always used my mom's line. Her line is Lash Bomb and she didn't have mega volume lashes, but that's mainly what I was using and teaching.

 

And I was like, "You know what, I'm just going to start mega volume, just a little boutique line, whatever. No big deal." And she was like, "If you start it, I'll sell it." And I was like, "Okay." So, I just started it. But I was like, "Oh my God, I really want to name this Lash Anarchist." And you know what happened was, I went to the International Beauty Show in Vegas and I randomly somehow ended up meeting up with Shelby from Lash Boss Radio.

 

I was star-struck. I had been listening to her podcast. And I was like, "Oh my God. I'm so used to hearing your voice." It was weird to meet her in person. We were hanging out at a pool one day and we were having drinks or whatever. And I told her about my blog. And I was like, "I really want to just rename everything as Lash Anarchist." And she was like, "Oh my God, dude." She was like, "I'd love to have you on my podcast, but rename it. Just do it right when you get home."

 

And I think just having that boost from somebody that I looked up to gave me that push. And I was like, "I'm just going to fucking do it. And I'm just going to be me." It's going to be such a load off because when you're authentic and you're true to things that you like and you actually want to say, it's so much easier to write content. It's easier to write your copy, make pictures, do your website. It's so much easier. And it's so much more fun.

 

I went home and I switched everything and it was like everyone really responded well to it even though I thought it would be a big deal. Sometimes you think it's going to be such a big deal and it's really not.

Sheila Bella:

In your head. Yeah.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah. Like people are not going to like this, it's too like radical or whatever. But people were like, "Oh my God, that suits you so much more."

Sheila Bella:

I love that the way, oh my gosh, the way you found authenticity is you were invisible. Who are you, actually, if no one knew, if there were no consequences, if it wasn't tied to you? That's such a good exercise. If you were to start an Instagram or a company and it wasn't tied to you, like nobody know your family, your friends, your coworkers, your colleagues, how would you create it? And that's exactly how you found your true voice.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah. And you know what? That's something I didn't even think of before was I was worried about my family too and my friends. Like, what are they going to think? I mean, I'm going to go back to family. What is my super conservative, [crosstalk 00:26:07] family going to think of me? Nobody really cares. They knew how I was.

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. Hello.

Ali Lilly:

Not tricking anyone.

Sheila Bella:

Oh my gosh, this story is brilliant. It really is. I'm so blown away by... No wonder you're so authentic because you got to put on some training wheels, so to speak, you got to, yeah. Minus the consequences. And you're like, "Wait a second. I can step into this." One of the best things I think for business owners is to have an alter ego that you turn into or something. Like a version of you, I suppose. I feel like I do that sometimes. But still you, it's authentic to you, but it's like a version of you for your business. There's a book, Todd Herman's alter ego that talks about it. Like Beyonce has Sasha fierce.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah. I've heard about that. I totally would have that so that if you ever do have nerves, even right now, I'm putting on my alter ego, my Lash Anarchistic and it just really helps me, I don't know, just be bold and be who I want to be rather than what I'm scared I truly am. You know?

Sheila Bella:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Mm-hmm (affirmative). Because you can take off that hat. You don't always have to be that person. It's still you. It's still you. But sometimes it's exhausting-

Ali Lilly:

Yeah, totally.

Sheila Bella:

... being Lash Anarchist and Sheila Bella is exhausting.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah.

Sheila Bella:

When my wig comes off at the end of the night and my lashes come off, I'm like, "I don't want to be her right now. Oh my gosh. I can't.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah, no. That's legit. That's totally true.

Sheila Bella:

Right? People probably look at my face and be like, "How do you smile so much? I'm exhausted."

Ali Lilly:

You're like, I become myself in between videos, it's fine.

Sheila Bella:

I just want to relax [inaudible 00:28:12]. Okay. So, I love that you're direct. Now, I just want to ask you, did you develop that directness? Because there's a lot of leaders who are watching right now. Right? Who are leaders of businesses and salons and have to tell people what to do. Have you always been that way or did you develop that? And how?

Ali Lilly:

I feel like I have always been a weird, little, individualist leader, but that is, I think, if we take it way back. My mom is like, she goes through phases of different things. But growing up, she was going through the phase of being this crazy hippy lady. And me and my brother were homeschooled. And so, if I wanted to have friends or any attention at all, I really just had to be outgoing.

 

And I've always been, I don't want to say bossy, because I don't think I'm bossy at all, but I've always been somebody who's going to do what I want to do. And I'm going to find a way to do it. If you don't want me to, that's fine. I'll probably still figure out how to do it though.

 

So, there is that, but I have, like I said, I've had to develop skills, being a leader. And especially having people work with me or for me doing collaborations where I've had to learn how to not be such a pushover. Like I said, I think at first I was a pushover and then I went into, "No, I'm a boss bitch and I have no emotion, and you're not allowed to have any emotion."

 

And now I've figured out this balance. Because I realized neither of those worked, but certain things about both of them did work. So, it's been something that I've learned in business, but it is also part of my personality. Like you know, I'm a seven on the Enneagram, so I'm very outgoing, very sociable. I love a good time. I love a party. I want to find any experience that's going to be fun, I'm going to be there. I'm probably going to make the plans for it. But I think it is something that I think you have to cultivate over time, especially if you're somebody who is a little more reserved or quiet.

Sheila Bella (ad):

Hey, question for you. How much money do you think you've spent in total on permanent makeup training, lash training, the trainings that improves your craft? Easily thousands of dollars by now. My next question is, did any of those trainings teach you how to make money? Probably not. You may be an amazing artist, but they can't pay you for your talent if they don't even know you exist.

 

Having a solid business structure is essential to a successful beauty business. And if your goal is to get more clients, more students and more customers in your business this year, then Pretty Rich Bosses is the mentorship program for you. Pretty Rich Bosses is my mentorship program that combines one-on-one personalized coaching with the magic of group coaching and community to teach you everything you need to have a successful beauty business.

 

This isn't a one-size-fits-all program, this is a relationship. And as somebody who has built two multi-million dollar beauty businesses, getting you to your goal is not going to be rocket science for us. We can help. This is the sales education you never got. Great art alone isn't going to give you a successful beauty business. It's not going to give you the life of your dreams. It's a combination of art and a great business and marketing structure.

 

So, what are you waiting for? If you are 80% sure that Pretty Rich Bosses is the program for you, it's the only thing you haven't done yet, why don't you go ahead and book a complimentary strategy call with either myself or any one of my advisors. And all you need to do is go to sheilabella.com/apply. That's sheilabella.com/apply. Accelerate your success, get there faster and let's do it together.

 

Sheila Bella:

So, can you trace back, what do you think is one of the most difficult conversations you've ever had to have even with either your family or with a team member that you had to confront, or maybe like a colleague? Yeah, just walk us through it. What's one of the most difficult conversations you've ever had, that you were really proud of? Like, "Wow, I really handled her or him. I handled it." And you were yourself and you said it and you were like [crosstalk 00:33:16].

Ali Lilly:

You know what? Honestly, I think it is the conversation that I had to have with my mom in therapy when I told her that I wanted to leave the salon that we had built together.

Sheila Bella:

Ooh, that's tough.

Ali Lilly:

It was really, really hard. And I was pregnant at the time too, so-

Sheila Bella:

Oh my gosh.

Ali Lilly:

... I was just like... But we were getting to a point where the salon could be run on its own. It was fine. I didn't need to be there, but I was probably eight or nine months pregnant. I was becoming a mom.

Sheila Bella:

Oh, yeah.

Ali Lilly:

And I was like, "This isn't going to work for my life. I don't want to constantly be butting heads with my kids' grandma." And it wasn't my dream salon. It wasn't my dream job. So, I was just like, "I really need to leave and do my own thing. And I'm going to find somebody to replace me or whatever. I'm not going to leave you high and dry." But yeah, it was that conversation. Having to leave that.

 

I also worked for Lash Bomb at the time, I was a trainer for them and I had developed all their education and I told her I was just leaving all of it. And I knew it was going to be really, really hard on her. But yeah, I knew it was something that I had to do for my family and for my happiness.

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. Yeah.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah.

Sheila Bella:

Woo.

Ali Lilly:

That was crazy. But I did leave it for the therapy office.

Sheila Bella:

I love therapy. I'm a fan.

Ali Lilly:

That's amazing.

Sheila Bella:

We go regularly, rain or shine. We talk about what's going wrong and what's going well. And it's like, oh, sometimes we have nothing to talk about. Sometimes we play a game in there. There's been sessions where our therapist is like, "What's going on with you guys?" And I was like, "I don't know."

Ali Lilly:

Nothing.

Sheila Bella:

What's going on? And then he was like, "All right. Let's play a game." And so we play an intimacy game or whatever. I don't know. But yeah, it's totally [crosstalk 00:35:16].

Ali Lilly:

Oh, good. Those are the therapy sessions, seriously, for my mom and I were so valuable. And even for me as a business owner, I learned so much about communication and certain words that are triggering to people when you're trying to explain to them something. Like saying like, I feel that this is something... Instead of being like, you're always... Learning different ways to say things.

Sheila Bella:

But they are always, aren't they? Why can't I say that? It's well, you are always.

Ali Lilly:

Because that is generalizing Sheila.

Sheila Bella:

Okay, fine. I want to stay married. Fine. I feel like you always.

Ali Lilly:

Right.

Sheila Bella:

I'm not sure if I'm right, but it sure does feel like you always. Oh, that's so great. Okay. So, do you agree with this statement? So there's two things. I'll just do one thing for now. Okay. And we talked about this a couple of weeks ago in our coaching call that when you don't know how to communicate, when you don't know, if you're not used to it, you tend to think that everything is an argument when confronted with something real, or challenging, or you tend to think it's an argument.

 

So, well, I posted it. So, yeah, duh, I agree with it. But I just think that sometimes people who have not built their communication muscles, they just think everything is an argument. Yeah. Do you agree with that statement? Why or why not?

Ali Lilly:

Yeah. Yeah, absolutely. No, I love that you posted that. I mean, of course, in the landscape of everything that's happening right now, you see it a lot and it's hard because not everything has to be an argument. When you go into a conversation about something, say it's with an employee, or with your spouse, or your friend, I've been having a lot of conversations with friends who maybe just this past year we don't agree on certain things that are going on. Right?

 

But it's like, if you can't talk about it and you already have your mind made up to the point that you want to argue, you want to change somebody's mind about something, then yeah, you need to work on your communication skills a little bit. Because it's okay to disagree on things. This happens in the lash world all the fucking time too. That's what I think it's so funny. It transcends to all these different situations.

 

Even in the lash world, there are certain trainers or lash artists that'll be like, "This is the right way to do things and everything else is wrong. You're doing it wrong." And then there's like, I'm over here. I'm like, "This is how I do things and I'll teach you that. But if you do it a different way, I don't care how you get there. You just fucking get there."

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. I hear you. I hear you. And I feel like, man, let's go there. The world right now, our country is headed in a really scary place if we don't learn how to communicate and have grace with each other and just not like automatically villainize people for being associated with a certain group or the group think. They're individuals and people are forgetting that's how kind people have been to them in the past.

 

Like it's purely based on whatever it is they believe or who they voted for. They forget like, "Oh crap, you were really there for me when this was happening." We're forgetting that. We're losing our sense of humanity because people are so emotionally tied to these issues. It's like a religion.

Ali Lilly:

It is. I was literally listening to something this morning. It was a podcast episode and they were talking about how politics has become an actual religion. And it's like people feel as deeply about that as they do about their religions. And it makes sense, but it's the same thing with religion. I'm not religious now because I choose not to be, but I was raised very one way. But I don't disagree with anybody's religion. I totally understand exactly what it's like to be deep inside of a belief and to really not be able to see outside of that, because of my only perspective. And I feel like it's the same way with a lot of the stuff that's going on this past year politically and racially. It's like you really only can see things from your one perspective.

 

So, if you can keep that in mind and realize that everyone comes from a different background. We see things from a different vantage point. So, it's not fair to, I shouldn't even say it's not fair. I don't think it's morally right to cut people off or cancel people because they come from a different background and they don't understand where you're coming from. I don't think that's the way to spread love, or knowledge, or teach anybody anything. And I think it's just changing.

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. I agree with you because I mean, isn't that how love dies when there's no communication oxygen? I mean, communication is the oxygen of relationship. Shouldn't you talk to somebody until you understand at least where they're coming from and you don't have to agree with them?

Ali Lilly:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. I really fear for that. If people stopped talking to one another, they can't talk to each other. They can't talk about current events, big current events. You can't talk about this big thing that just... Don't talk about that. You know what I mean?

Ali Lilly:

It's like literally all that's happening and you can't even talk to your friends about it. And it's like, "Oh, so stressful."

Sheila Bella:

Absolutely.

Ali Lilly:

But you know what it reminds me of?

Sheila Bella:

What does it remind you of?

Ali Lilly:

I hate to even bring this up, but-

Sheila Bella:

Bring it up.

Ali Lilly:

... how we're also isolated and we've been so isolated in 2020. I am really starting to see which of my friends are extroverts and which of them are introverts and which are a little bit of both. I'm super extroverted. I need to be around other people to gain energy and insight. Seriously, I lose all my motivation and energy if I'm not around other people having interaction.

 

And some people are not like that. Some people it's draining to them, you know? But it reminds me of when you're annoyed with a friend because maybe she said something or whatever, and you're like, "Ugh, they're so annoying." And you'll be talking about them behind their back maybe with another friend. But then you all get together and then you forget how annoying that friend is because you're with her in real life and you can have empathy again. And you're like, "Oh, okay. Maybe I'm not mad at this friend. He's a good person." I feel like we're all missing that because we haven't been able to be together for a long time.

Sheila Bella:

That's such a good point, Ali. I saw that. We've all lived that. You totally relate to that. So, a little personal, my husband and I have for a very long time, for like several years, were not really talking to his parents. There was like a falling out or a huge incident, and they live on the East Coast. And now we're good. We're great. And it's because we've all realized that if we were in the same town and we had to see each other, that would not have been years. Maybe that would have been like a good two weeks or something like that. But yeah, that proximity is really important.

 

And then, so now what we do is we schedule intentional time to Zoom with them and have dinner with them on Zoom and stuff like that, and talk about these issues. That's what we've been doing, actually, last couple of months. We get on Zoom the four of us and we just talk it out. And it's been wonderful. And we're like, "Oh yeah, you're not as mean as I told on my friend [inaudible 00:44:18]. Oh my gosh, you're not."

Ali Lilly:

I think when you're away from someone for so long, you forget their humanity. You forget that they have emotions too and they're real people, they're allowed to have flaws. It's the same reason why with husband and wife or your partner or whatever, you make time to go on dates and rediscover being with each other alone because you can totally forget and just get caught up in the routine of everything.

Sheila Bella:

True.

Ali Lilly:

I feel like that's happened like a couple of friends, even just this past year where we've had some disagreements or whatever. And I'm like, "You know what?" In my mind I'm like, "We wouldn't be having this disagreement if we were just hanging out." Maybe we would, but we'd get over it. But we wouldn't be able to just stop looking at our text messages and not talk to each other for a while. You know what I mean? When you're around people, you kind of, I don't know, maybe you just feel their energy. I'm such an empath though.

Sheila Bella:

Or you see like, "Oh, it's different." Like, "Oh, you have pores." Oh, you have pores. I see it. Like you got to breathe. You know what I mean? I feel like those little things and we lost touch of that. And like, you're going to make me cry because you want to talk to me about how you're an extrovert and you need people. I feel like I've shunned that part of me because I can't fulfill it right now. Right?

Ali Lilly:

Yeah.

Sheila Bella:

If I really were to focus on that, I feel like I might cry. I really miss being around a lot of people as an extrovert as well.

Ali Lilly:

I had the craziest hard time last year, dude. That was one of the things, if anything or I got into disagreements with my friends about they'd be like, my friends were like, "Keep things close. You need to stay indoors to keep people safe." And I'm like, "I need fucking social interaction." I'm like a tiger in a cage just pacing back and forth, freaking the fuck out. I miss people. I miss humans. I miss my friends. I miss traveling like fuck, man.

Sheila Bella:

Well, I pray that this year that all resolves. I see a light. I see a light.

Ali Lilly:

Kind of. Me too. Me too.

Sheila Bella:

It's coming. It's coming.

Ali Lilly:

I mean, I feel bad for everybody living in California. Sorry, Sheila. We actually can go out to eat. I can have under 10 people in a class in my classroom here. So, I'm just so grateful to, we're grateful of right now.

Sheila Bella:

Oh my gosh. No, not us. Mm-mm. No. But it's common. No, we are shut down. Nothings happening. So, I'm really enjoying these Lives because it's good for my mental health at least.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah.

Sheila Bella:

It's something. Okay. Quick question. Do you agree with this statement, and it's something that I say all the time, the universe rewards risk. The person that risks the most just gets the most. Period. It's almost like, don't be afraid to do anything because chances are 99.9% of the time when you risk, you win. Your brand is very risky. I mean, you have middle finger pop sockets, I want one, by the way. I want one.

Ali Lilly:

I'll send you.

Sheila Bella:

So, I mean, so do you agree with that statement and how has it been true or untrue in your experience?

Ali Lilly:

Oh my gosh. That's so funny. So, I actually put that on my stories today. I was like, "I'm going to be talking to Sheila. These are three things about business." Because I wanted to talk a little bit about her coaching too. Because it's been wonderful and it's only been two months.

 

But I was like, three truths about business. One is that you're going to have to get uncomfortable all the time. You're never going to be able to just work really hard and then get comfortable and then sail. You're going to have to continue to get comfortable. But number two is, you're going to have to continue to invest. And then three, you're going to be taking risks, no risk, no reward. And I find that in risk with things that you're investing in and then also taking risks with some of the things you do for your brand or things that you put out there.

 

I felt like it was really risky, for whatever reason, changing my name to Lash Anarchist and putting myself out there. And like I said, I was a cocktail server in a bar for years. I have a dirty mouth. I swear like a sailor. I've gotten a little bit better at keeping it together now that I have a five-year-old that copies me. I'm getting better. But I really think that whenever I've taken a risk, it has always paid off, or I've taken a risk on something and it just flops and it's really not that big of a deal.

 

I was actually talking to a friend about this once because she's really reserved. She's an introvert, whatever. She's in the lash world. And she was like, "How do you just say whatever the fuck you want? How do you just put yourself out there like that?" Or I'll put myself on my stories with no makeup on or whatever. And I'm like, "Oh."

Sheila Bella:

You had a peel the other day.

Ali Lilly:

Oh my God.

Sheila Bella:

[crosstalk 00:50:08] freaking peel.

Ali Lilly:

I had a full face laser treatment, this halo laser. It felt like I put my face through a fucking meat grinder. It was insane. It was insane for like three days but now I'm one whole week out and my skin is fucking flawless. Look at me. Anyway. No, but when I did CoolSculpting on my double chin, I put the whole thing on my Instagram stories because I thought it was really funny. And she was like, "How do you have the guts to-"

Sheila Bella:

How do you do that?

Ali Lilly:

"... just do that?" Yeah. And I'm like, "I don't know." I honestly just don't care. The thing is, is people will either think it's funny or they'll get the fuck off my page because they don't need to be.

Sheila Bella:

Why are you still watching?

Ali Lilly:

Yeah, exactly. If you don't like me, you don't like my brand and you don't want to buy from me, you don't like my content, move along. I'm not for you. It's fine.

Sheila Bella:

They won't follow you. That's what I think too. Just post it because if they don't like it, they won't follow you. And if they are following you and they don't like you, do they really not like you? There's something about-

Ali Lilly:

They're watching you.

Sheila Bella:

100% of the people that follow you, guaranteed like you. It's either they love being annoyed or something. They just like you, period. There is no risk. Go for it.

Ali Lilly:

Right. Well, that's the thing. I was just like, I don't know. If you put it out there, all the risks that you don't take, you won't gain anything off. It's like what is it? What is that saying? All the chances you don't take, you lose?

Sheila Bella:

You miss 100% of the chances you don't take. I think that's what it is.

Ali Lilly:

Thank you.

Sheila Bella:

I think that's what it is.

Ali Lilly:

That is true. You just put it out there and who cares?

Sheila Bella:

Okay.

Ali Lilly:

It will do something or it won't do something, but you got to take the risk.

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. Even on YouTube. If they don't like it, they'll click next within the first five seconds. All the people who made it all the way to the end clearly liked it. So, it's 100% the people who watch you like you or have to be. Guys, we just figured out the universe, you guys. We're not even high. Sorry. I don't do that. I don't do that.

Ali Lilly:

I know. I write these little or I used to do stoner thoughts by Ali and people would be like, "Oh my God. You're so funny. I didn't know you smoke." And I'm like, "I don't smoke. I literally just have stoner thoughts." I just think like a stoner sometimes.

Sheila Bella:

You know what? It's like my husband. It's legal now, whatever. So, he described weed to me for the very first time. He was like, "It's like this." And then he took a magazine, right? He took a magazine and then he put wax paper on top of the magazine. And then he was like, "So, this is the world right now," he said. "Now, when you get high," and then he took the wax paper off and he was like, "This is the world." And I was like, "What? That's what it's going to be like?"

Ali Lilly:

You really don't ever? You've never smoked weed?

Sheila Bella:

No, I have. Yeah, I have.

Ali Lilly:

Oh, okay. I was like, is he really describing it to you for the first time? It's so funny. No, but it's true.

Sheila Bella:

When I met him, I never did. That was like 10 years ago. I didn't have my own beer. I was 29 years old. I've never had a beer on my own. Will taught me a lot. I don't know if he's a bad influence.

Ali Lilly:

Thank God for him.

Sheila Bella:

I don't know. I don't know.

Ali Lilly:

True. It just takes you out of your head and you're able to look at the world or even a situation that you're in from a different perspective. And you're just like, "Oh." Like for me, it takes the emotion out of it and I'm just like, "Oh, that's what's happening."

Sheila Bella:

Or it helps you to tap into-

Ali Lilly:

I usually have some sort of [crosstalk 00:54:24].

Sheila Bella:

... your emotion. Helps you tap into your emotion. Like, "Oh, that's there?"

Ali Lilly:

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Sheila Bella:

Oh man.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah.

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. It's really, really interesting.

Ali Lilly:

Whenever I smoke, well, I don't even smoke. If I do weed, I eat edibles. Also, it's legal here now too. But whenever I do, I get in this zone where I'm like, wow, you're being unhappy right now because you're being too much of a workaholic and you're forgetting about these other things that you like. My brain always reminds me stuff. It's like, "Hey, you need to cool it here and then get more [crosstalk 00:55:07] here," or something.

Sheila Bella:

I get those downloads too.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah.

Sheila Bella:

I get those downloads too. I'm going to call my mom out. So, my mom was in just terrible pain last year. She was in so much pain. She had sciatica. Her spine, the cushion was just gone. Gone and she was in just such terrible pain that she was willing to try anything. So, we tried that and there was an afternoon where I was really trying to help because it was bad. Pain was a 10. So, I got high with my mom in the middle of the day.

Ali Lilly:

That sounds so fun.

Sheila Bella:

Well, I wasn't even trying to, I had work to do. It was a Wednesday. Wednesday in the middle of the day during quarantine. I was trying to be encouraging because she was doing it for the first time and I just did a little too much. So, I was like, "Oh, crap. I can't work now. Oh, no. I can't work. Will, when will this go away because I got to work?"

 

I got all these downloads that I'm like, "Oh, I got to slow down." I told Laura, who's my work wife, how much I loved her. And then she was like, "Shut the fuck up Sheila." And I was like, "No, no, no really, really. I get it. I just don't say it often." So, anyway. Yeah, I get it. It is a perspective shift and it allows me to sometimes tap into the things that I'm suppressing, like telling people I love them and stuff like that.

 

Okay. Next question. So, do you have a favorite failure, because of something that it taught you? Because people see you now as you're Ali Lilly or the Lash Anarchist, you give no shit. Right? You you don't give it. But do you have a favorite failure?

Ali Lilly:

I do. I actually have a lot. And it's funny because I don't even look at things as failures anymore. I've gotten past that because I think I've learned to just-

Sheila Bella:

Amazing.

Ali Lilly:

... Yeah. Just being an entrepreneur. I don't even know if I'm a crazy entrepreneur. I'm not like Gary V. I'm not like [inaudible 00:57:31] 48 different businesses. I'm just trying to work for myself and be able to say, fuck it in my taglines and I have tattoos.

Sheila Bella:

Goals. Those are my goals.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah. Those are my goals. But I have learned just over time that everything is ever evolving. So, when something doesn't work out, I don't think I get so attached to my dreams anymore because I realized that they evolve. As I get closer to them, they can change or they can turn into different things. But yeah, probably my favorite failure at the time, it really felt like it, was moving. I owned my own salon after the one with my mom, because I felt like that was a failure too, is backing out of that salon.

 

But then I started my own. I had my dream salon, it was decorated exactly how I wanted it. I co-owned it with one of my best friends and we were a perfect business match. And then it just didn't really make me that happy anymore. I ended up moving to Arizona and I ended up selling my portion of that salon to one of my employees that worked there for $4,000.

Sheila Bella:

Oh my gosh.

Ali Lilly:

And I felt like that was a huge failure. And I was disappointed. I lost money on it. And I was just trying to tell myself, "At least I got out of it without losing anything, or everything," I should have said. Yeah, I was like, fuck. This is bad.

Sheila Bella:

What did you learn?

Ali Lilly:

Well, I learned that sometimes salons aren't worth that much. Your business might not be worth that much. I also learned that sometimes you have to take a step back to make two steps forward. And that was something that I really needed to do. Because I think the biggest failure or the biggest blow, I guess, was to my ego. I went from being a salon owner with four employees and two booth renters to being a booth renter myself.

 

And I was like, "Oh." And I was starting over with clientele. I was brand new on Instagram. I was building a business from scratch in a new city where I didn't know anybody. So, I was just like, "Wow. I just gave up all that for four grand to come here and be a booth renter again." But then what I learned about six weeks later when I had a full fucking clientele again and I was so happy, was that I don't want to be a salon owner. I really enjoy working for myself and I don't like having to manage everybody.

 

I also feel like I didn't do salon ownership well. I could have done a better job with what I know now. But yeah, I was just so much happier and I was like, "Why was I so stuck to the idea of being a salon owner when doing this other thing makes me so much happier?"

Sheila Bella:

Why were you so stuck?

Ali Lilly:

Like I said, I think it was my ego. I liked being like, "You know what, I'm 24. I own a salon."

Sheila Bella:

You liked being able to say that.

Ali Lilly:

Yeah. I was like I was successful. Because in school, we did the day where we created our dream salon and we had to come up with the menu and the logo and your brand kit for it and all that stuff. And then when I finally had it and it was tangible and it was making me money, I was like, I fucking am successful. I made it. And then when I walked away from it with almost nothing, I was like, "Wow, I didn't really make it."

Sheila Bella:

Wow. Wow. That's a really good story. And Bella Bosses over there says, "Oh my gosh, this is my story." So, a lot of people probably relate to this. I think we just get so tied up in the idea that we have to be a hashtag boss babe, but what if management are scaling? What if no amount of money can make you happy? It's all about your life. Design your life. Design your life first. What do you want your life to look like? Not just your bank account. What do you want your life to look like? [crosstalk 01:02:17]. Thank you for sharing that.

Ali Lilly:

What you do every day is your life. And so it's like, if I didn't enjoy going into the salon every day doing this, what was I doing my life? So, I don't know. That one was a really big one for me because I think I just realized, and it's something like... I know you love Gary V. and so do I, but he talks about it all the time. If you're in a job you hate and you're making $200,000 a year wouldn't you rather be in a job that you absolutely love making $50,000 a year? And I'm like, "Yes, I really would." Because I've been both basically.

Sheila Bella:

Mm-hmm (affirmative). Mm-hmm (affirmative). And after that, I really do believe that you can have both. You can. You can have a job that you love and that makes a lot of money, but that requires risk.

Ali Lilly:

Risk. And you know what? I think it requires a lot of hard work and a lot of time and investment. And I don't think that people know. I actually reposted somebody's post about this today. But it's like, "If you're not willing to basically risk what we're talking about or invest your time and your money into your business, then maybe this business isn't for you."

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. It's not for you. Don't want more. If you're overwhelmed because it's like you get into business and then you're like, "Oh gosh, I've got to pay for this. Oh my gosh, I've got to pay for that. Oh, I don't want to pay for that." Don't quit your day job. I'm sorry, you're just not cut. It's not for you. You can't be scared of those things. When people put on their vision boards at the beginning of the year, they're like, "I really want this. I really want this. I want this." But then they're like, "I'm going to do real about this later." But they're like, "No, I'm not doing that." I don't know. I'm not going to pay for that. No, I'm not investing. Well, do you really want it?

Ali Lilly:

That should be a good reel.

Sheila Bella:

That's what I'm doing right now. It's going to be in this exact setup.

Ali Lilly:

I love it. I love it. It's true. Because I'll do coaching calls, and I'm sure you hear it all the time, but you'll be like, "Hey, you should do this thing." And people are like, "No, I'm not willing to do that." I've even told you that on our calls, like certain things I'm like, "Ah, I don't know."

Sheila Bella:

No girl. No. Not like I've heard in the past where I'm just like, "Really? Okay." You were going to do without me anyway.

Ali Lilly:

I know. Right? Like, okay then why did you hire me? I was going to say, even with hiring you, I got to a point in my business where I was like, "You know what? I really want to level up, but I'm plateauing." I'm at a point where I don't know what I don't know. And so, I don't know. For some reason, I just had a really good feeling about you, even my husband did. I'm really glad I had him on the first call that he was like-

Sheila Bella:

Yeah, me too.

Ali Lilly:

... every time you've invested something, you've made it level up our business. So, I trust anything that you're doing. But especially for me. So, let's say I did make this, I don't know, coaching decision to go with you, but it was a free thing. Okay?

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. Yeah.

Ali Lilly:

For me, if I don't have risk on the line, I don't work as hard as I work to get the results. So, it's like, I have to risk in order to receive. It's like part of my personality.

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. Why would you take a free fitness class. Why? There's free workouts online all the time. When you pay for a trainer, you're like, "Oh, crap. I got to get up. I got to get up. Wear my gym clothes." Yeah, you got skin in the game. I get it. Okay. So, second to last question. If you were in my shoes, what question would you have asked yourself that I didn't.

Ali Lilly:

Oh. Hmm. Oh my God, you've put me on the spot. I'm like, I got to get better at my interview skills anyway, it's about me.

Sheila Bella:

What question do you think I missed? What is something huge about you that I'm like, I totally missed? Something you're known for as a huge event in your life or something that's on your heart right now that you've totally been talking about to people and I totally missed it because I'm an idiot. I'm an idiot.

Ali Lilly:

Wow, I feel like we covered everything-

Sheila Bella:

A lot.

Ali Lilly:

... I've been talking about lately definitely. I don't know. I think with my brand, what people ask me a lot is how I, but we went over this, how I figured out how to make it so unique or stand out in an industry that's already saturated? I know you've heard this with PMU. People are like, "How do I stand out in an industry that's already saturated?"

 

And I'd say, this is probably my number one message in my brand is I try to lead by example with this, but just being authentically you and yourself is the single most important thing that you can do for your brand. I really truly believe that because, I mean, people can tell if you're not being genuine. They can sniff you out if you seem fake or overly salesy, you don't believe in your product, they can tell. You have to love your product. You have to love your brand, your salon, in order to sell authentically.

 

And I'd have to say, even my employee yesterday, Alex, she gave me the biggest compliment ever, but she was like, "I love how you can sell without sounding salesy." And I was like, "You're so sweet," but it really is because I love my products. I developed them. I branded them. I love my training. I've worked on it for the past five years. So, I don't know. I really just think being yourself is one of the most important things that you can do for yourself, your own mental health, but also just for your brand, for your business. And I know it's scary, but I think it's just 100% worth it.

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. Yeah. You're so good at it, Ali.

Ali Lilly:

So are you.

Sheila Bella:

So, for our listeners who are... Aww, thanks girl. High five. So, for our listeners who are listening to the audio version of this, where can they find you on social media and how can they work with you?

Ali Lilly:

So, on Instagram, I am @lashanarchist and online it's www.lashanarchist.com. And you can email me at [email protected], whatever. I have online courses, I have coaching calls and I also have in-person classes of private and group classes. My signature class is The Layer Slayer Workshop. And I absolutely love that class. I go over all of my favorite things about branding, the way that I marketed myself through my clientele.

 

I have creative mapping in there. Some of the things that I did as a lash artist that made me stand out in my industry. I teach all of those maps. And then I have some freebies on my website too on how I lash in layers. It's called lashing in layers. It's a mini workshop. It's totally free. And then I have raise your prices, which is also totally free.

 

And in raise your prices, I go over everything that you need to know about how to raise your prices, when, what to tell your clients, how much to raise your prices, all the things that keep you up at night about raising your prices. I go over each one of them individually so that you can feel better about each of them. And then how to talk to your friends and your family about cutting off discounts, and trades, as verbiage on how to tell a client, like if a client is upset with you for raising your prices or says that's too expensive, what to say to them about that.

Sheila Bella:

Wow.

Ali Lilly:

I'm very passionate about pricing.

Sheila Bella:

I love that. Yeah. Guys, run, don't walk, run to Ali's raise your damn prices. And how do we go there, again? Lashanarchist.com?

Ali Lilly:

Lashanarchist.com. Yep. Or my Instagram. I'm on Facebook. I'm on Twitter. I'm on fucking all the things right now.

Sheila Bella:

Clubhouse? Are you in clubhouse?

Ali Lilly:

I'm on Clubhouse?

Sheila Bella:

You are on Clubhouse. I saw you the other day.

Ali Lilly:

That was so fun. I loved clubhouse, actually.

Sheila Bella:

Yeah. That was really fun. That was really fun. Thank you so much for spending this time with me. I just adore you, and guys, [crosstalk 01:11:52] follow.

Ali Lilly:

Yes. Yeah, thank you so much for having me. I want to have you on my podcast when we are wrapping up our six months thing together because I really want to talk about it because even though, like I said, we've only been working together a couple of months, I feel very strongly about coaching. And I feel like you've already mind-blown emoji-ed me several times where I'm like, "Oh my God." Made my job so much more simple. I've been doing things the hard way and you showed me an easy way and I'm like, "God dammit, that was worth the money right there."

Sheila Bella:

Aww. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. I really appreciate it. Really appreciate you. And I love working with you. I really look forward to our calls. And now Alex is here I'm like, "Woo."

Ali Lilly:

I know. She's so fun. I love Alex. I got real lucky with her, so.

Sheila Bella:

She's awesome. Okay, you guys. Take care, everyone. Have a great day. The audio of this is going to be on probably next week on Pretty Rich Podcast. Bye, Ali.

Ali Lilly:

Nice. Bye, Sheila. Bye, guys.

Sheila Bella:

Hey, thanks so much for listening to today's episode of Pretty Rich Podcast. If you want to continue the conversation longer, check me out on Instagram. It's my favorite place to connect with you guys @realsheilabella. I'm happy to answer any of your questions or simply to chat and get to know you better.

 

And if you end up doing something super awesome like screenshotting this episode and reposting out of your stories, that would put the biggest smile on my face. Don't forget to tag me. I appreciate every share, and love feedback from my listeners. Also, do you have my number? Do you have my number? Because if we're going to keep hanging out, you should probably have my number so you can actually text me. That's right. You can text me at (310) 388-4588.

 

And if you're sick and tired of doing business alone, and you're interested in accelerating your success by hiring a business coach or joining our mentorship program called Pretty Rich Bosses, go ahead and just apply. Why not? Check it out. Go to sheilabella.com/apply and we'll schedule a free strategy session with either myself or one of my advisors. And of course, I got to include my kids. So here to send us off are Beau and Grey.

Grey:

[crosstalk 01:14:31].

Sheila Bella:

Grey, say share with your friends.

Grey:

Share with your friends.

Sheila Bella:

Please review my mommy on iTunes.

Grey:

Please review my mommy on iTunes.

Sheila Bella:

Thanks for listening.

Grey:

Thanks for listening.

Sheila Bella:

Hey, Beau, can you tell everybody what our family motto is?

Beau:

Yeah. I can do hard things.

Sheila Bella:

I can do hard things. Good job, buddy.

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